Expedition to focus on Decatur’s historical architecture, offer lunch at Decatur restaurants

Posted by Dena Mellick August 20, 2015
The Avary-Fulton House is said to be Decatur's oldest remaining private residence. Photo provided by the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation

The Avary-Fulton House is said to be Decatur’s oldest remaining private residence. Photo provided by the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation

An event in September is combining a tour of historic Decatur architecture with a taste of Decatur restaurants.

The Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation is partnering with the City of Decatur and the DeKalb History Center on Saturday, September 26 for the Georgia Trust Decatur Expedition.

A press release says, “Guests will have the opportunity to tour historic private homes spanning the decades from Mid-Century to Mid-Century, exploring architecture from the 1850s through the 1950s.”

Tour participants will get to see some of the oldest homes in Decatur, including the 1850s Avary-Fulton house, which is believed to be Decatur’s oldest home that has remained a private residence. They’ll also get to see the 1830s High House, the first two-story house constructed in Decatur.

The press release says, “Guests will enjoy lunch from their choice of participating downtown restaurants including: Georgia Trust Preservation Award winner Cakes & Ale, Victory Sandwich Bar and Kevin Gillespie’s newly opened Revival. While downtown, check out the Menaboni eggshell mural in Brick Store Pub. A $10 lunch voucher is included in the ticket price.”

The cost of the program is $45 for Georgia Trust members and $55 for non-members. Tour-only tickets that do not include a lunch voucher or the closing reception are also available for $25. For more information or to register, visit www.GeorgiaTrust.org or call 404-885-7817.

Here’s the full press release with more details:

The Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation is partnering with the City of Decatur and the DeKalb History Center to showcase the rich history and architecture of Decatur during the Georgia Trust Decatur Expedition, Saturday, Sept. 26.

Guests will have the opportunity to tour historic private homes spanning the decades from Mid-Century to Mid-Century, exploring architecture from the 1850s through the 1950s.

After a brief orientation in the morning, guests will explore some of the oldest homes in Decatur including the 1850s Avary-Fulton House, said to be Decatur’s oldest home that has remained a private residence, and the 1830s High House, reportedly the first two-story house constructed in Decatur.

Guests will enjoy lunch from their choice of participating downtown restaurants including: Georgia Trust Preservation Award winner Cakes & Ale, Victory Sandwich Bar and Kevin Gillespie’s newly opened Revival. While downtown, check out the Menaboni eggshell mural in Brick Store Pub. A $10 lunch voucher is included in the ticket price.

Guests will spend the rest of the day exploring more historic buildings including two mid-century homes and gardens. Registrants will also tour the 1930 Watkins Building, which held two of the city’s earliest grocery stores.

The day ends with a special closing reception at a 1925 Colonial Revival private estate with towering views of Deepdene Park, which was designed by famed Central Park landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted and his sons at the turn of the 19th century. Guests will have the chance to tour the home while enjoying light refreshments.

The Georgia Trust Decatur Expedition is $45 for Georgia Trust members and $55 for non-members and includes a lunch voucher and the closing reception. Tour-only tickets that do not include a lunch voucher or the closing reception are also available for $25. For more information or to register, visit www.GeorgiaTrust.org or call 404-885-7817.

About the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation

Founded in 1973, the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation is one of the country’s largest statewide, nonprofit preservation organizations.

The Trust generates community revitalization by finding buyers for endangered properties acquired by its Revolving Fund and raises awareness of other endangered historic resources through an annual listing of Georgia’s “Places in Peril.” The Trust helps revitalize downtowns by providing design and technical assistance in 102 Georgia Main Street cities; trains Georgia’s teachers in 63 Georgia school systems to engage students in discovering state and national history through their local historic resources; and advocates for funding, tax incentives and other laws aiding preservation efforts. To learn more, visit www.georgiatrust.org.

About Dena Mellick

Dena Mellick is the Associate Editor of Decaturish.com.

View all posts by Dena Mellick

  • Chris Billingsley

    Looking forward to this, especially the tour of the Avary-Fulton Home, a place I’ve often admired while driving down Columbia Drive. It’s hidden by huge magnolia trees and easily overlooked.
    An important characteristic of a “Great Place To Live” community is reverence for the past. Decatur shouldn’t be all about great restaurants and bars, diversity and the constant drumbeat of progressive politics but activities like this (and others).
    I commend the Ga. Trust and Decatur/DeKalb History Center for promoting not only this event but also several recent Civil War remembrances.

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