Dear Decaturish – Just say ‘no’ to new cities

Posted by Dan Whisenhunt September 23, 2015
A map of the proposed city of LaVista Hills

A map of the proposed city of LaVista Hills

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Dear Decaturish,

It is my understanding that the LaVista Hills movement is upset with the AJC article that the proposed revenue will be less than anticipated.

I am more concerned about other misrepresentations to the community by the pro-city movement. The pro-LaVista Hills group in public meetings contends that court functions will remain in DeKalb County despite the fact that they are going to duplicate services.

LaVista Hills residents will have to support the County Court system whether there is a new city or not. However, LaVista Hills will also unnecessarily duplicate services for municipal court functions. Municipal taxes will be used to support a Municipal Court, judge, public defender, solicitor, court clerk (and staff) and city attorney. (All these functions are currently run by the county.)

Of course there will be taxes to pay these employees or 1099 contractors, along with buildings (rented or built) to house the Municipal Court.

If the LaVista Hills Yes movement did not mention the court system in their presentation to the public I would not be as concerned.

However, by blatantly misleading the public before they get into office, I am extremely concerned about what happens if they get in office.

When it comes to cityhood, just say “no”.

David Markus, P.C.
Attorney at Law

About Dan Whisenhunt

Dan Whisenhunt is editor and publisher of Decaturish.com. https://www.linkedin.com/in/danwhisenhunt

View all posts by Dan Whisenhunt

  • DecaturMax

    More…. he said…. she said….

    Line 833-874 of Bill 520 that would establish Lavista Hills talks about the establishment of the Municipal Count of The City of Lavista Hills. There is no doubt the proposal includes a local police force supported by a local court. Who is confused on this? Since Dekalb will not be enforcing the laws within a new city this is not a duplicated service? It is a parallel service….. just like Gwinnett does not duplicate Dekalb services. They just service another area.

    I compared and unincorporated tax bill to a Dunwoody tax bill. Mr. Markus has a good point that the cities appear to be getting charged for services the county is not providing because there is no line item specifically for the courts on the tax bill. Could be a worthy challenge down the line to have one added?

    I can’t speak to the specifics or context of the LVH statement referenced since it was not cited or attributed with a context. My experience is that Lavista Hills is a movement supported by enthusiasts who are often just neighbors answering questions to the best of their knowledge. That is the way it has been done in my neighborhood.

    Other cities with police forces function and pay for their local courts just fine.
    http://www.decaturga.com/city-government/city-departments/administrative-services/municipal-court
    http://www.brookhavenga.gov/city-departments/municipal-court
    http://www.dunwoodyga.gov/index.php?section=departments_court_

    Mr. Markus, What core Lavista Hills official told you “court functions will remain in Dekalb county” and when?

  • notapunk

    I don’t get the big deal. But, like Decatur Max, I don’t know what the LVH people said or how they said it. It’s too bad Mr. Markus didn’t include that.

    Big court services will stay with the county. Felony cases, jury trials, grand jury sessions, appeals of bench trial decisions by a Municipal Court judge, civil cases, etc. all go to Superior Court. County keeps juvenile court and probate court, too.

    Cities need a City Attorney anyway, so a Municipal Court really doesn’t make a difference on that point. And aren’t most Municipal Courts in a city of the size of LVH housed in the City Hall building or complex? They don’t take up that much room. The biggest “trial” you’ll see in one is a bench trial.

  • DecaturMax

    That brings up an interesting questions. Since running your own court allows you to collect your own fines, how expensive are courts to run when factoring in revenue from fines and forfeitures? My online research has Dunwoody collecting $1,345,000 in fines and forfeitures in 2014. They budget 580k for the municipal court and expect to collect 1.5 million in 2015. See page 17 of the Dunwoody municipal budget and several articles including an AJC article about Dunwoody collecting way more than court costs in 2009. Itsy, bitsy(but lovely) Avondale Estates collected $300k plus in 2014 per Decaturish article.

    If the cost of running a court is the issue for Mr. Markus, I think this evidence with real sources and documented info shows it is at the worst revenue neutral and more likely a money maker for a new city.

    • RAJ

      DeKalb County is what! $20 Million+ in revenue…..helps pay for public safety?

  • threeperrros

    Please pardon the mistakes in my previous post, but Lavista Hills does say that the courts in Dekalb County will still be run by the county. I know LVH is talking about Superior and State Courts and probably some aspects of the municipal court, but most people do not know the difference. What people do NOT understand and what they have NOT heard from Lavista Hills is that more than likely its own residents will be the violators of traffic and other city violations and therefore will be directly supporting all those municipal court functions. Many aspects of what will be in this city are serious errors of omission.

    • notapunk

      Why would anyone expect to hear that? We actually have a pretty smart, educated population here. How difficult is it to understand that if you drive too fast or run a light you run the risk of being ticketed — no matter where you live? I’d say that’s pretty much a given that doesn’t need to be articulated and people make the choice to break traffic laws taking into account the odds that they’ll get caught. They also learn pretty quickly where the odds are high. Protip: don’t speed through Hall County, Georgia. The Sheriff’s all over that highway.

    • anonymous

      I love it that people in our neighborhoods are constantly complaining about traffic: speeding, poor enforcement, etc. They want speed humps, signs and more officers. So, here we have a potential opportunity to actually address these concerns, and now you want to complain about that. Which way do you want it? Keep the problems or actually ticket law breakers and address them? You can’t have it both ways.

      • Eva Shaw

        Why do commuters think that they are ENTITLED to drive the speed limit during rush hour. Whine, whine, whine. Enjoy your commute.

      • Save Tucker!

        Where will you have your courthouse? Spig? Napolean’s?

  • Cities Are Bad

    This man sounds smart and speaks the truth. If it were to became a city and those city people came into Dekalb County they would have to go pay their fine to the county at their court building instead. I am not saying that Dekalb police would target the city livers but they could. Righteus punishment if I do say so myself. Keep Dekalb Strong and keep our courts from being smaller and with less people working in them. The county needs your ticket money too! Vote against this nonsense and follw the advice of the lawyer that wrote this article. Too many jobs at state to lose them to some crappy city that just wants money to spend.

    • Jan Atlanta

      I have to laugh again at “Cities are Bad”. Glad he’s keeping at it and punking DeKalb Strong and opponents. Thanks for helping with advocacy CAB!

      • Cities Are Bad

        I am not a punk either. There was someone with a name earlier that had punk in it though.

    • Marjorie Snook

      Ah, our favorite troll, pretending to be anti city because you want government jobs.

      But of course, anyone wanting more government jobs should vote for a city, since we’d be creating a new layer to staff. The DeKalb Court doesn’t get smaller, we just have a whole new one to deal with.

      • Cities Are Bad

        I am not a troll. I am not some creature from fantasy books. Dekalb County has more jobs than the city would have and the county would lose jobs if the city forms. That is a fact. Courts schmorts. We dont need any new ones to process all of the anxious prius drivers and soccer moms on their way to their busy lives. Keep dekalb strong and keep these dimwits from making a new government and taking our jobs.

  • Decaturmax

    It took me 5mins to read the bill. Why was it so easy for me to find and understand? Now that it is clear city courts are not expensive and may make money, the rhetoric shifts . Now the scare tactic is a potential speed trap…….some day in the future.

    • Marjorie Snook

      Who do you think they “make money” FROM, Decatur?

      Also, think about the costs of the policeman’s time, who was writing tockets for busted tailights instead of a more useful public safety function.

      We suffer when we turn our police into revenue agents.

      • DecaturMax

        Like it or not the way to suppress many violations is via fines. It does not mean they will be abused or be a primary income stream. How does Dekalb punish people that run the stop signs at N Druid Hills and Clairmont…..fines. Dekalb Police sits there and write tickets all the time. Blame the offenders, not the police. It does not matter if tehy are city police or county police. Would you suggest that Dekalb County status quo does not include revenue from fines and forfeitures(Drug dealers money and cars)? Don’t be a Hypocrite. It does!

        Police are a line item on the city bill. That money would just shift to the city. Police are paid for.

        The point is that you can’t argue about the cost of courts if they pay for themselves. It is not inefficient to have courts for traffic and misdemeanors on a city level. It is not a duplication nor a high city expense…..maybe not an expense at all.

        • Simple

          Not exactly. The new government’s police services will be stretched since they are cutting so many police officers in the area. The area is also accident prone so that is really not a good combination. If there had not been such a rush, then an analysis could have been done to give us an idea of what to expect (beyond the fact that the new government is not feasible). Fines may not be as lucrative as projected. Look at Dunwoody who is projecting a 10% decrease in fines this year, despite a 40% increase in police budget over last 2 years.

          • Decaturmax

            Simple likes to cherry pick numbers. Check the Dunwoody budget. Dunwoody collects more than double court expenses in fines/ forfeitures in the worst scenario. Having your own court is economical. The numbers published and cited prove it true.

            Simple, did you see how the dunwoody budget grew less than 3 percent even though you selectively picked a few budget lines that made it look like city government spending was growing at massive rate.

          • Simple

            You mean discussing the one line item that takes up 1/3 of the budget is cherry picking? I could possibly see your point if we were talking bout the ‘marketing’ line item’s growth of 13.75% in two short years.

      • Guest

        From what I saw in a DeKalb Strong discussion, the cops won’t have time to write nuisance tickets.

      • HB

        I don’t understand. Are you saying you support citizens violating speed limits and code violations?

        I don’t know about you, but I tend to follow speed limits, especially in residential areas. Helps keep children and pets safe.

        • Marjorie Snook

          I support fines being used as a tool to promote public safety, not raise revenue for a city government. If the primary purpose is the latter, the former suffers.

          • HB

            But how can you assert that this will definitely be the case? It will be up to the kind of leadership YOU choose to elect.

            I truly respect your passion and dedication, Marjorie. But you and Dekalb Strong, more often than is comfortable, present opinion and pessimistic worst-case scenarios as factual assertions — which is what drove away my support. You disregard that the government we elect will reflect our community’s values–and I think you’ll agree we have some fine people, some great thinkers among us. Not all cities are bad. We have an opportunity to become another one of the great ones. We can do this. It’s all up to *who we elect.*

            Why not use the energy you spend defending the status quo and the known crooks in Dekalb in a more pro active way — by running for mayor? *I would likely vote for you.* You can curtail corruption and keep em honest, and we get more representation.

          • Marjorie Snook

            I have used no energy defending the status quo. I have dedicated a large amount of energy to fighting the DeKalb status quo, something cityhood doesn’t affect in a positive way.

            Rejecting a bad solution to a problem does not mean you are deciding to ignore the problem. It just means finding better solutions.

            We do not use worde case scenarios. Most of our argument relies on examining the experience of other cities, which have ballooning costs, additional corruption, higher crime, and out-of-control development that is making them unlivable.

          • RAJ

            Your efforts to “change” the stats quo were ONLY in response to the rise of the city hood movement , by your own admission DeKalb Strong(a misnomer)did not exist before then.

          • Marjorie Snook

            Post hoc ergo propter hoc? I expect better from you, Raj, than such pedestrian logical fallacies.

          • RAJ

            NONE of the reforms you sought in the legislature have been implemented and the internal auditor has been buried in the personnel Dept.

          • Marjorie Snook

            They are in process. One of them is awaiting voter approval, so legally has not been able to take effect yet. In the end, though, these reforms will take effect a heck of a lot faster than a city will be able to form and take over services.

          • RAJ

            As I mentioned above, the Legislative reforms have to be implemented by the very people -The Board of Commissioners and ICEO- that DeKalb Strong supports. They are both dedicated to retaining the status quo and have no intention of improving DeKalb County governance. Cityhood, with some degree of self determination, helps us move toward the prospect of better governance.

          • HB

            Marjorie – here’s a great point I’m not sure I’ve seen voiced: It doesn’t have to be either/or. If finding a solution to Dekalb corruption is now a passion of yours (and kudos for that) — there is no reason you can’t continue that. We can have the additional representation that a city will give, AND have a group to watchdog the county. We are still going to need people to do that. I would hope and expect that DS is truly committed to this cause and will not disband if we get a city.

          • Marjorie Snook

            There is a limited amount of energy, and energy poured into the city is energy that is not being expended on the county. I am simply unable to watchdog the county and the city at the same time, it is a massive amount of work. I have small children and a demanding job. I simply cannot do both.

            Shoot, tonight, there is a big meeting about the soccer deal with the commissioners, and the Alliance is distracting from it with another one of their misinformation dog-and-pony shows.

          • HB

            Interesting you say “Post hoc ergo propter hoc!” This could be said about the claim of “ballooning costs” in new cities. Taxes increased in some cities, for sure. But ballooning real estate values and county reassessments are the primary cause of these tax hikes. As we know, even non city areas saw this spike.

            Most of my acquaintances in new cities say the impact, *in real life terms*, is anywhere from negligible to positive. No significant negative impact reported from those who understand tax hikes are primarily a county/economy/realty issue–not ’caused’ by the city.

            Interestingly, several have mentioned a renewed sense of community by having a defined “sense of place” — which translates into a greater community involvement, a positive that builds upon itself.

          • Marjorie Snook

            Costs increased in all the cities by massive amounts. Roughly 20% of the budget is spent on redundant overhead, new facilities, and lawsuits. Those increases in expense have nothing to do with real estate values or county assessments.

          • Jan Atlanta

            This is simply not true, Marjorie. Peruse almost any post/comments on DeKalb Strong website and you’ll find the repeat prolific posters who assume the worst scenario – they intuitively “know” that LVH will use the police force as a revenue generator, over-develop and create traffic nightmares. cut down tree canopy and pave over greenspace – the list goes on and on. The derision by Tim, Anita, the Honorable Pat Killingsworth, and others is immature and despicable. It’s appalling that the Honorable Judge Pat, who calls LVH Alliance members “budding criminals” and hollowly accuses them and their leadership of removing their event listings, is the DS representative at the NBCA debate next week.

          • Marjorie Snook

            Actually, mostly they just post articles about the experiences of nearby cities.

            People can judge for themselves who is being immature and derisive. One thing you can say: they all at least have the conviction to put their names behind their comments, instead of launching personal attacks on people under the cover of pseudonyms and fake social media profiles.

  • RAJ

    If you want to talk about WHY city operations are more efficient than DeKalb County operations just consider that the County has about 1600 unfilled but budgeted county employee positions in the current budget which equals about a $64M at 40K(including benefits) “cushion” for the ICEO to spend on WHAT? Check with Jeff Rader if you don’t think these numbers are correct….even he was astounded!

    • Efficient

      What exactly do you mean when you say cities are more efficient?

      • RAJ

        Very simple….you get more service for your tax dollar(the SAME dollar you WERE paying the County)and Dunwoody and Brookhaven prove this point as was mentioned at today’s House committee meeting.

        • Save Tucker!

          More service? In what way? More water out of your faucets? More trash picked up from your curb? More potholes filled (due to there being more potholes from the more traffic?) More and better are not the same thing. Sometimes less is more. Some people prefer fewer interactions with their government… fewer traffic citations, fewer parking meters, fewer trips to the polls to have to vote to get the bad guys out and hope the new guys will be better. That’s great if Dunwoody has the money to spend on more and more stuff. But this isn’t Dunwoody. And Northlake is a far cry from Perimeter Center. Be realistic.

  • Russell Carleton

    Dunwoody’s budget grew 2.85 percent from 2015 to 2016. The problem is that LaVista Hills’s feasibility study uses budget data from 2012 and 2013 as its baseline.

    Dunwoody’s total budget in 2012: $20,920,727.

    Budget in 2015: $22,724,168

    That’s an 8.62 percent increase.

    • decaturmax

      Exactly. And than number is below rising revenue.2012 budget was based on highy depressed 2011 numbers

    • RAJ

      Dunwoody taxpayers got what they decided THEY wanted to pay for and that’s the point of CITYHOOD! And they seem to be real happy….. and successful!

    • notapunk

      And yet Dunwoody is holding the line on its millage rate AND has an assessment freeze. Homesteaders pay 1.74 mils. It’s not coming on the backs of homeowners. And still, companies want to relocate there and bring jobs to the area.

  • HB

    Time to man up: We need to step up and take responsibility for our own area if we want to improve conditions. Stop passively “hoping” some benevolent leader in Dekalb county is going to suddenly step up to “take care of you.” Do you ask others to run your household budget? Of course you don’t, because no one understands your needs better than you. I truly can not understand the anti-city folks who are actually *choosing* to continue letting others run their life, and are blocking those of us who want to determine our own fate.

    LVH groups are simply setting up a structure. WE will pick who represents us, not them, and by doing so, WE pick the agenda best for our area.

    Nobody –not one of you, not any group — has presented one practical idea for how we would “fix” the Dekalb corruption. A vote against cityhood is a vote for the status quo. It’s time we grow up and take control of our own future.

    • Russell Carleton

      Who are these “others” that are running our lives?

      • HB

        The county. One that is far too big to effectively manage all the areas it now encompasses. When this county began, it was a sparsely populated farm community, and it made sense back then to have such a large jurisiction. But today, with so many communities and so many different challenges for each one, it’s absolutely inefficient to continue the “one size fits all” approach. It is this sheer size that allows the prevailing corruption to thrive. Smaller areas are better able to oversee and monitor expenses. It’s not rocket science, it’s basic economics of scale.

        • Russell Carleton

          If you want to base a case on administrative efficiency, that’s one thing. What I’m wondering is why you present “the county” as an “other” whereas I assume you mean that a city government would represent “us.” In what way are the people in “our community” fundamentally different from “them?”

          You state that there are “so many communities and so many different challenges for each one.” What are the specific challenges faced in this community that are not present in other communities?

          • HB

            Is this really a serious question? RusseIl, your credibility gap is showing. I am talking about different kinds of economic development and infrastructure improvements that vary between urban and suburban areas. There are vastly different tacks we take for either regarding density, smart growth, building repurposing, connectivity, walk/ride paths, public transit futures, etc.

            You are obviously attempting to race bait here, and it’s not doing you or your case any favors. For the record, I am not white. I chose to live in N. Dekalb for work/life reasons of my own. I have many of white friends living in S. Dekalb. And others living out past Tucker. Each area has its own character, and should be governed by those that live in that area, period.

            The issue is that Dekalb is just too damn big to govern effectively and efficiently, and the sheer size makes corruption easier to hide. Smaller, more accountable oversight for ALL localities is in everyone’s best interest, always. There is no intelligent argument that can be made to the contrary.

          • Russell Carleton

            If your concerns relate to “master plan” sorts of issues (many of the issues you bring up relate to urban planning questions), do you believe that the “character” of the LaVista Hills area should change. If so, in what way?

            And for what it’s worth, I actually agree that the county is too big to function efficiently as a local government. What I’m wondering is whether it makes sense to hitch my wagon to this particular proposed local government or not.

          • RAJ

            Think about it ,then vote YES on LVH; if it passed I for one hope you will be active in the new City…you can make a positive contribution and experience a rewarding learning curve. You have taken a few hits(we all have)but it may be worth the challenge. Same for HB and NFA. There IS a master plan of annexations for Central DeKalb that balances all of the complex factors, including schools, with data panels drawn from the County tax records. Dan has a copy of the map. It cost $320 so don’t try this at home! A brief description(contingent on LVH passing)is an orderly series of annexations for the remainder of Central DeKalb, with neighborhoods and commercial property distributed between Atlanta, LVH, and Brookhaven. The map is ONLY a starting point and has been distributed to members of the School Board, Legislature, and other select elected officials for review. If LVH fails at the polls?…..another map(another $320)of Briarcliff revisited and a bill to be introduced in the 2016 Legislative Session. Today’s House committee meeting at the Capitol indicated that we will soldier on with Cityhood and Annexation.

          • jo

            There is no “master plan” of annexations” by leaders. A couple retirees have their master plan and most folks simply file it in their round file. “Graft-fueled business decisions”…..geezz, Boyer was PRO-city, probably to further hide her graft. And Sandy Srings was never like north DeKalb. It sat in Fulton county,under the thumb of Atlanta which it fought tooth and nail to avoid; total apples and oranges! “Each has its own character and geography” and that must be why LVH used out of county legislators to seize a significant section of Tucker for LVH.

          • RAJ

            Plans for 2016 annexations and how to handle them are underway in both the House and Senate as we post……no master plan yet but someone needs to be thinking about the consequences of future annexations.

          • HB

            I’m not sure exactly what you’re asking–please clarify if you’d like to discuss. But, bottom line, I look to the examples of Decatur and Sandy Springs. They elected leaders based on their expressed visions, then worked toward it. Both now enjoy over 90% approval from citizens and significantly higher property values. The “character” develops organically from there based on who chooses to buy, live and create business there, and as we know, that evolves over time.

            SS used to be very much like N. Dekalb–a primarily suburban/strip mall area with no defined town center. Through a set vision, they found space for that and are building it as we speak. In half a generation’s time, no one will remember when there was no city center. ATL has evolved so much in the past 50 years–I find it somewhat silly when folks use the argument that there is no “town center” for LVH. Let it happen. Every town center was built at one point.

          • Russell Carleton

            If the idea is that you would like to see LaVista Hills develop a city center, presumably some sort of commercial district, then that’s reasonable to propose. There’s good and bad about that sort of development and I’d listen in on whether the good outweighed the bad.

            I think the question of “where” isn’t something so easily dismissed, but I suppose there could be a decent answer to that. It’s also worth asking what that would cost. There most certainly would need to be infrastructure work ($$$) done to accommodate such a city center. Maybe you make the case that it’s a good investment. On the other hand, there are probably plenty of people who bought around the area because it’s a nice, quiet, and doesn’t have a busy city center to deal with.

            If that’s what we’re really aiming for through incorporation, then let’s be upfront about that.

          • HB

            My wishes for incorporation basically involve smart growth, so that our area remains a highly desirable place to live as Atlanta evolves. Smart growth in some cases means protection, not overbuilding. A city governed by those who live right here among us is exactly what can help protect our area from becoming a dump. Dekalb has no reason to protect the area, and they haven’t. Look at the devolution of Northlake–used to be a prime address 20 years ago, but now its future is questionable due to graft-fueled business decisions made by folks who don’t actually live here, and thus don’t care as much as we do. A city govt comprised of local neighbors that we elect is going to better preserve what we love about our area, and help channel funds (we already pay) to create new amenities we need. (Example, we are woefully behind on bike paths and public transit connections. The more we build, the higher our property values will remain, because new buyers now demand this, and most other areas of ATL are ahead in this area.)

          • RAJ

            In a digital city the “City Center” would be in your smart phone….just pull-up any city hall you want and call it LaVista Hills….kinda like a home page. We need to take this opportunity to “build” a modern, effective, cost efficient, city government. Just don’t need that much infrastructure to provide 3-4 city services.

          • NotFarApart

            The big issue is the process. Most residents would not disagree with this statement. Yet, this process is splitting neighborhoods and leaving service gaps. If cities are the answer, then what do we do with the areas now unincorporated like Druid Hills? If Druid Hills goes to Atlanta, then what do we do about the schools? The rush leaves more questions than answers.

          • HB

            NFA, with respect, these are both straw man arguments. There will be no service gaps. The neighborhoods that chose to not be included in LVH will retain the same services they have now.

            And there are many neighborhoods in Atlanta that have city or county borders bisecting them–and there is no loss of community. In real life, nobody discriminates or shuns anyone based on which tax line they fall under. Ask anyone in Candler Park or Lake Claire. Most don’t even know where these defining lines fall exactly. There are plenty of intelligent arguments for or against cityhood, but worrying about bisecting streets for fear of community exclusion is not one.

          • notapunk

            Look at Druid Hills Country Club. City of Atlanta border goes right through it.

          • Marjorie Snook

            Right. One of the motivations of TIA to annex the rest of Druid Hills into Atlanta, since they don’t like having their community split between jurisdictions.

        • Eva Shaw

          LaVista Hills, if voted a go, will still be “sleeping with the enemy”. Kinda like being a “little bite pregnant”. There will be NO autonomy, only problems with the bureaucrats at the city level and a constant threat of higher taxes.

        • Marjorie Snook

          Basic economies of scale refers to the cost advantages that enterprises obtain due to size, output, or scale of operation, with cost per unit of output generally decreasing with increasing scale as fixed costs are spread out over more units of output.

          Economics doesn’t really have any principles stating that smaller enterprises oversee expenses better.

          • HB

            I imagine you can’t find anyone who would say that having only an overriding Federal govt for all states would be better than letting each state additionally determine some of their own laws. Each has its own character and geography, unique challenges associated with each. Same with counties within a State, and cities within counties. Some overriding laws are fine–but allowing for some local control in smaller jurisdictions is not only more efficient, but gives more representation to the citizens.

            Curious, why on earth would you not want to allow the various areas of Dekalb be granted additional representation? Are you similarly against Georgia having its own laws underneath the Federal laws?

          • notapunk

            Actually, there’s study of studies that does find limits to economy of scale… and it’s much lower than the population of DeKalb:

            http://www.nj.gov/dca/affiliates/luarcc/pdf/final_optimal_municipal_size_&_efficiency.pdf

  • jo

    Dunwoody Police want another $2 million in their budget. They say their crime is the highest its ever been. Say they don’t have the people and resources to handle it, AGAIN. I doesn’t look like a sustainable model. Brookhaven City leaders broke the law to hide allegations against the former mayor; Same Stuff Different Government. I dont see the need to create more problems for our area. Cops are good, crime is low, redevelopment is happening and their is more civic interest than ever. Upset about something with the county then contact N. Jester.

  • jo

    ” They didn’t seem to find a problem “….How do you know? Please stop belittling and defaming people. I looked and the owners are a company that is not in good standing with the sec of state’s office. Another layer of government will not change the fact there is no listed company officer to serve. I googled the 3 hookah bars and saw nothing that directly linked them to crime. Maybe mentioning them is just a lame attempt at negative innuendo? The trash can and bus sign belong to MARTA and I expect MARTA to remedity that situation and I observed the sign on the side of the road not in it. ” Illegal activities allegedly taking place “, again why are you trying to link this intersection+alledgedly illegal activities and the county? “The FBI uses it to lure people suspected of using computers to arrange sex with minors”…ROFLMAO….And we should vote for an initiative that endorses tactics like that to influence the vote?

    • RAJ

      That area looks like crap and is an embarasement to the neighborhoods. That intersection(and others)will be a priority for LaVista Hills City Government!I

    • notapunk

      Tactics? I am not part of any initiative. I’m just a citizen trying to raise children within a couple of blocks of that intersection.

      You apparently are not very familiar with the area or what goes on there late at night. The bars in Williamsburg Village are late night establishments holding themselves out as restaurant/hookah bars.
      Check crimemapping to see where the bulk of the crime in the immediate area is happening.
      Google “DeKalb late night establishments” for previous reporting on the problem and how it manages to persist.
      Go through some sex offender arrest records if you don’t believe me about suspected sex offenders and the FBI. It’s documented.

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